Corpus Christi Local Movers – 361-883-1372

A listing of common relocation/moving terms and their definitions

Definition of Moving Terms

Accessorial (additional) charges: Services such as packing, appliance servicing, unpacking, or piano stair carries that you request to be performed (or are necessary because of landlord requirements or other special circumstances). Charges for these services are in addition to the transportation charges.

Additional transportation charges: Compensate the mover for services performed in areas where labor rates are higher — usually major metropolitan areas. These costs usually range from $1 to $3 per 100 pounds but can be even higher in places such as New York or Los Angeles.

Advanced charges: Charges for services not performed by the mover but instead by a professional, craftsman or other third party at your request. The charges for these services are paid for by the mover and added to your bill of lading charges.

Apartment locator service: Akin to real estate agents for apartment hunters except their service is free. These folks are loaded with information about apartment complexes — some cover just their immediate area, some are more regional. They can save you a lot of legwork. Find them in the Yellow Pages.

Agent: A local moving company authorized to act on behalf of a larger, national company.

Appliance service: Preparation of major electrical appliances to make them safe for shipment.

Appliance Dolly: Supplied by self-service movers to help you load and unload large items like appliances and oversized furniture.

Assessed Value Coverage: This specifies how much money per $1,000 of assessed value, you will need to pay to cover your household items to their full assessed value. Purchasing this protection requires that a cash value be assigned to the items you will be moving. If a deductible is applied, that value is stated next to the cost-per-$1,000 figure. For example, 7.50/100 means that the consumer must pay $7.50 per $1,000 of assessed value to cover the load against loss, and the first $100 of damage is not covered.

Some valuation policies are calculated on a sliding scale, where the price per $1,000 of coverage will vary depending upon the total amount of coverage. In such cases, carriers are requested to quote valuation prices based on $25,000 of coverage.

Please note that most valuation policies require that the entire load be covered, not just specific items. Ask your carrier for terms.

Bill of Lading: This is the contract between the mover and the customer. It also acts as a receipt. It is important to understand everything on the bill of lading before you sign it.

Carrier: The moving company — either local or long distance.

Cartons: Moving company boxes come in a variety of sizes. Some, such as dish barrel, wardrobe and mirror boxes have an obvious purpose.

Others are not so obvious — here are their suggested uses:

1.5 carton: 16 3/8 x 12 5/8 x 12 5/8 — books, records, tapes, canned goods, shoes.
3.0 carton: 18 1/8 x 18 x 16 — small kitchen appliances, lamp bases, small outdoor tools, pots and pans, electronic gadgets.
4.5 carton: 24 x 18 x 18 — nonhanging clothes, larger lamp bases, lamp shades, linens, nonbreakable kitchen products (Tupperware, baking pans, etc.)
6.0 carton: 24 x 18 x 24 — stuffed toys, blankets, pillows, area rugs, winter coats.

Cash discount: Some do-it-yourself moving companies give a discount to customers who pay cash instead of using a credit card — usually in the 3 percent to 5 percent range.

Cost of Move: All cost estimates are calculated based on information obtained from the listed moving companies during a signup interview. Although every effort is made to gather the most accurate information, customers should be aware of the fact that many factors effect the cost of a move.

Cube sheet: Table of estimates used by moving company sales reps to determine the size and weight of your shipment.

Declared value: The value of your shipment is based on the total weight of the shipment times (for example) $1.25 per pound. If the shipment weighs 5,000 pounds, the mover would be liable for a maximum of $6,250. Settlement is based on the depreciated value of the item. If movers charge $7 per $1,000 of assessed value for this coverage, you’ll be charged $49.

Discount: Most long-distance carriers charge according to an annually revised book called “Tariff 400? published by the American Moving and Storage Association. It tells the moving companies how much they can charge for hauling X pounds for X miles. To stay competitive movers heavily discount the tariff — usually 40 percent to 60 percent.

Double mortgage assistance: A relocation perk — An employee relocates, buys or rents a house or apartment, but is still paying a mortgage on a previous home that hasn’t sold yet. The company agrees to pay one of the mortgages for a limited amount of time.

Escrow: Two or more people deposit money or valuables with an independent third party until terms of a contract are fulfilled.

Estimates: The estimated cost of an interstate move is usually based on the weight of the shipment, the distance it’s shipped and any additional services the customer wants, such as packing. The estimate in a local move is generally based on the amount of time it will take to complete the move. There are three main types of estimates — binding, nonbinding and not-to-exceed. Binding estimates are a guarantee that the shipment listed on the bill of lading will be delivered for the stipulated price. However, anything added later or any problems (see accessorial charges) that arise will result in additional charges. Nonbinding estimates are not guaranteed; they’re simply an approximation of expenses. Movers may charge for a binding estimate, they may not charge for a nonbinding estimate. Few local movers offer a binding estimate. In a not-to-exceed estimate the mover gives the customer a binding estimate, then weighs the van and reduces the price if the shipment weighs less than estimated.

Exclusive buyer’s agent: A real estate agent who exclusively represents buyers.

Expedited Service: This is an agreement to transport goods by a set date in exchange for a higher rate.

Full Replacement Value Coverage: This specifies how much money per $1,000 of value, you will need to pay to protect your household items for their full replacement value. Full replacement value is the amount of money it will cost to purchase a new replacement for a damaged item, regardless of how old the damaged item was. If a deductible is applied, that value is stated next to the cost-per-$1,000 figure. For example, 7.50/100 means that the consumer must pay $7.50 per $1,000 of declared replacement value to cover the load against loss, and the first $100 of damage is not covered.

Some valuation policies are calculated on a sliding scale, where the price per $1,000 of coverage will vary depending upon the total amount of coverage. In such cases, carriers were requested to quote valuation prices based on $25,000 of coverage.

Please note that most valuation policies require that the entire load be covered, not just specific items. Ask your carrier for terms.

Guaranteed Pickup and Delivery Service: A premium service whereby dates of service are guaranteed, with the mover providing reimbursement for delays. This type of service is often subject to minimum weight requirements. Interstate Move -
Any move which crosses a state boundary, regardless of the number of miles. Distinguished from Local Move or Intrastate Move.

Home buyout: A relocation perk. A company that is relocating an employee or hiring a new employee agrees to buy the employee’s current home to facilitate the employee’s relocation.

Intrastate: A move within a state, but generally outside the 30-mile limit that defines a local move.

Interstate: A move that crosses state lines.

Local move: Generally, a move that is within a 30-mile radius.

Lump sum value: If the value of your shipment is greater than $1.25 per pound, you can get additional coverage by declaring a specific dollar amount. If you say your 5,000-pound shipment is worth $10,000, you’ll be charged $7 per $1,000 of assessed value, or $70.

Main perils: Insurance company terminology. A peril is a cause of loss. Main perils could include fire, accident and theft. Earthquake and flood are generally not considered main perils and aren’t covered under a standard policy.

Move consultant: There are companies that will handle your move from “origination to destination.” Among other things, they’ll contact the movers, decide which estimate is best, contract for whatever additional services you want and assist in dispute resolution. Because of the volume business they generate for movers they can often get customers a better discount than the carrier would normally allow. A move consultant’s services are generally free to the customer.

Packing charges: An added service. The moving company will box any or all of your shipment.

Released value coverage: All interstate movers are required to assume liability for the shipment at a rate of $0.60 per pound at no cost to the customer. Most people would find this grossly inadequate. If the mover bounces your 45-pound television down your front steps, you’ll be reimbursed $27. This coverage may be good for transporting furniture that has little value — such as a college student who’s moving out of a dorm after graduation.

Relocation package: The benefits a company provides to new employees who must move or current employees who are transferred. The package may include real estate commissions, closing costs, temporary living expenses, house-hunting trips, travel expenses, apartment lease cancellation fees, tax gross-up, spouse/partner job assistance, double mortgage assistance or home buyout.

Shuttle: If the full-sized moving van can’t get to your current home or your new home because the street is too narrow or there are low-hanging trees or whatever, your shipment will have to be loaded onto a smaller truck called a “shuttle.” As you might imagine, this will significantly jack up the cost of your move.

Spouse/partner assistance: A relocation perk. The company that is relocating an employee offers to assist the employee’s spouse/partner in finding a new job. More and more companies are offering this benefit to nonmarried partners and same sex partners as well as spouses.

Tariff: The tariff governs the carrier’s rates, rules and charges concerning your shipment. The carrier must furnish a copy of the tariff to the customer upon request.

Tax gross-up: A relocation perk. An employee has to pay taxes on the reimbursements received from the company for relocation expenses. The gross-up is the amount of taxes the employee has to pay — this amount is given to the employee in addition to the reimbursement.

Valuation coverage: The coverage that is offered to reimburse you in case your shipment is lost or damaged is not an insurance policy governed by state insurance laws. The coverage is authorized by a division of the U.S. Department of Transportation called Released Rates Orders of the Surface Transportation Board. Generally, four levels of coverage are offered: released value, declared value, lump sum value and full value protection.

Weight ticket: The van is weighed before and after your shipment is loaded. Each time the van is weighed, the driver gets a dated weight ticket listing the weight and where the truck was weighed. A copy of the weight ticket should be with the freight bill.

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